Driving test low risk drive

Written by George Slewo

A Guide To The Driving Test Part 2 - Low Risk Driving Skills Road Positioning, Decision Making and Responding to Hazards

Advance and Vision Driving School

Low Risk Driving - Road Positioning
During the test you will be expected to maintain a safe, legal position on the road. This includes during manoeuvres such as a three-point turn and reverse parking.

Buffering is keeping as much space to the sides of your vehicle as practical in any situation. You should have at least one metre from other vehicles and hazards. Where you are not able to keep space from other vehicles and hazards you must slow down.

You should also change your position on the road to create space from hazards. On crests and curves, slow down and move away from oncoming traffic. When possible, you should be at least one metre from the centreline on blind crests and curves.

In multi-laned traffic, avoid driving in the blind spot of other drivers and in the high risk area beside other vehicles.If you unnecessarily drive on the wrong side of the road, or unnecessarily cross any edge lines or lane markings, you will fail.

Your positions when turning are important to maintain a smooth and safe flow of traffic. When turning left on unmarked roads you must approach as far left as practical. When turning left on laned roads, you must approach in the left lane, or any marked left turn lane.

As you finish a left turn, exit into the lane or part of the road that is best for the traffic conditions, but your choice will be dependent on the conditions and environment and where you would like to go next. However, when there are multiple turning lanes, you must finish in a permissible lane.

When turning right, steer to the right of an imaginary centre of the intersection. This allows vehicles opposite you to also turn right. As you exit, you must keep to the left of the centre of the road. When turning right into a one-way street, approach and exit as close as
possible to the right side of the road.

On multi-laned roundabouts position your vehicle in accordance with the road markings for the direction you intend to travel. You must exit in a permissible lane.
Approaching a roundabout: Vehicles entering a roundabout must give
way to any vehicle already in the roundabout.
Exiting a roundabout: If practical, you must always signal left when exiting a roundabout.

Manoeuvres that you may be asked to complete in the test:
A kerb side stop.
A hill starts.
A three-point turn.
Parking, reverse parallel, 90 degree or 45 degree, front or rear to
kerb (type depending on local availability).

During the manoeuvres you will be assessed on your ability to position your vehicle legally, safely and accurately:
You must:
Park close and as near as practical to the kerb.
Stay at least one metre away from other vehicles. (The test requires you to be no more than two metres from other vehicles when you park.)
Reverse only as far as you need
Where possible, finish as close as practical to the angle required for that parking area and within any marked lines.
Use effective steering. (The test allows a maximum of four direction changes for all parking manoeuvres.)
During the three-point turn you must check left and right for traffic before each movement.
During these manoeuvres you must check for hazards including oncoming traffic, pedestrians and other possible hazards on the road. You must always turn your head and check the blindspot before you move to the kerb to perform a manoeuvre, leave the kerb to rejoin traffic and steer, if when reversing you will enter another lane.

Low Risk Driving - Decision Making
A critical decision must be made whenever you enter traffic, change lanes, cross or turn at an intersection.

The testing officer will be checking that you go only when there is a safe gap in the traffic and that you are not affecting the crash avoidance space of other drivers. A safe gap ensures that other vehicles do not need to change their speed or position. During the test you will be expected to demonstrate smooth, flowing decision making. If you reject safe gaps or unduly stop at intersections when it is clearly safe to proceed, you may fail.

At some intersections, your vision may be affected by other vehicles, trees or buildings. In these situations you must demonstrate caution when proceeding. If you proceed into an intersection without due care, you may fail.

Low Risk Driving - Responding to Hazards
Your hazard perception skills are essential to low risk driving. During the
test you will be assessed on your ability to recognise hazards and make
an appropriate response.

As you scan the traffic environment you should be asking yourself whether the things you see could possibly enter your crash avoidance space. Make sure to cover the break, reduce the speed and create a buffer in these situations where you must act accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A Guide To The Driving Test Part 2 - Low Risk Driving Skills Road Positioning, Decision Making and Responding to Hazards

Advance and Vision Driving School

Low Risk Driving - Road Positioning
During the test you will be expected to maintain a safe, legal position on the road. This includes during manoeuvres such as a three-point turn and reverse parking.

Buffering is keeping as much space to the sides of your vehicle as practical in any situation. You should have at least one metre from other vehicles and hazards. Where you are not able to keep space from other vehicles and hazards you must slow down.

You should also change your position on the road to create space from hazards. On crests and curves, slow down and move away from oncoming traffic. When possible, you should be at least one metre from the centreline on blind crests and curves.

In multi-laned traffic, avoid driving in the blind spot of other drivers and in the high risk area beside other vehicles.If you unnecessarily drive on the wrong side of the road, or unnecessarily cross any edge lines or lane markings, you will fail.

Your positions when turning are important to maintain a smooth and safe flow of traffic. When turning left on unmarked roads you must approach as far left as practical. When turning left on laned roads, you must approach in the left lane, or any marked left turn lane.

As you finish a left turn, exit into the lane or part of the road that is best for the traffic conditions, but your choice will be dependent on the conditions and environment and where you would like to go next. However, when there are multiple turning lanes, you must finish in a permissible lane.

When turning right, steer to the right of an imaginary centre of the intersection. This allows vehicles opposite you to also turn right. As you exit, you must keep to the left of the centre of the road. When turning right into a one-way street, approach and exit as close as
possible to the right side of the road.

On multi-laned roundabouts position your vehicle in accordance with the road markings for the direction you intend to travel. You must exit in a permissible lane.
Approaching a roundabout: Vehicles entering a roundabout must give
way to any vehicle already in the roundabout.
Exiting a roundabout: If practical, you must always signal left when exiting a roundabout.

Manoeuvres that you may be asked to complete in the test:
A kerb side stop.
A hill starts.
A three-point turn.
Parking, reverse parallel, 90 degree or 45 degree, front or rear to
kerb (type depending on local availability).

During the manoeuvres you will be assessed on your ability to position your vehicle legally, safely and accurately:
You must:
Park close and as near as practical to the kerb.
Stay at least one metre away from other vehicles. (The test requires you to be no more than two metres from other vehicles when you park.)
Reverse only as far as you need
Where possible, finish as close as practical to the angle required for that parking area and within any marked lines.
Use effective steering. (The test allows a maximum of four direction changes for all parking manoeuvres.)
During the three-point turn you must check left and right for traffic before each movement.
During these manoeuvres you must check for hazards including oncoming traffic, pedestrians and other possible hazards on the road. You must always turn your head and check the blindspot before you move to the kerb to perform a manoeuvre, leave the kerb to rejoin traffic and steer, if when reversing you will enter another lane.

Low Risk Driving - Decision Making
A critical decision must be made whenever you enter traffic, change lanes, cross or turn at an intersection.

The testing officer will be checking that you go only when there is a safe gap in the traffic and that you are not affecting the crash avoidance space of other drivers. A safe gap ensures that other vehicles do not need to change their speed or position. During the test you will be expected to demonstrate smooth, flowing decision making. If you reject safe gaps or unduly stop at intersections when it is clearly safe to proceed, you may fail.

At some intersections, your vision may be affected by other vehicles, trees or buildings. In these situations you must demonstrate caution when proceeding. If you proceed into an intersection without due care, you may fail.

Low Risk Driving - Responding to Hazards
Your hazard perception skills are essential to low risk driving. During the
test you will be assessed on your ability to recognise hazards and make
an appropriate response.

As you scan the traffic environment you should be asking yourself whether the things you see could possibly enter your crash avoidance space. Make sure to cover the break, reduce the speed and create a buffer in these situations where you must act accordingly.

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