Driving test part 1 low risk drive

Written by George Slewo

A Guide To The Driving Test Part 1 - Taking the Test and Low Risk Driving Skills Observation and Speed Management

Advance and Vision Driving School
Taking the Test
When going to the testing centre, you have a full licence driver with you. If you fail the test, you will not be able to drive away on your own, hence you will need a licensed driver with you.

Always plan to arrive at the testing centre a good time before your appointment and make sure you have your Learner Driver Log Book and Licence with you. Make sure to give the Learner Driver Log Book and booking confirmation slip to the person at the counter, unless you use a digital learner driver log book app. This must be submitted at least 24 hours before you test and then you’ll only need to give the booking confirmation slip to the person at the counter. You will now be referred to a testing officer.


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Driving test low risk drive

Written by George Slewo

A Guide To The Driving Test Part 2 - Low Risk Driving Skills Road Positioning, Decision Making and Responding to Hazards

Advance and Vision Driving School

Low Risk Driving - Road Positioning
During the test you will be expected to maintain a safe, legal position on the road. This includes during manoeuvres such as a three-point turn and reverse parking.

Buffering is keeping as much space to the sides of your vehicle as practical in any situation. You should have at least one metre from other vehicles and hazards. Where you are not able to keep space from other vehicles and hazards you must slow down.


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ADVANCE DRIVING SCHOOL: WE ARE AN ACCREDITED NDIS PROVIDER

Written by Canrone Cochin

WHO WE ARE:

Since starting in 2006 after finding great success and enjoyment teaching my niece to drive, I've pursued a career as a professional, certified driving instructor. 

Now with over 16 years experience, I still thoroughly enjoy teaching people to drive and find one of my greatest skills is making my students to feel relaxed and stress-free. 

My philosophy is that not all students learn at the same pace, so driving lessons should be tailored to the individuals needs. Learning at an appropriate pace, with focus on the areas which need it, and where students wish to be challenged, produces confident and safe drivers.


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NDIS DRIVING LESSONS – ADVANCE DRIVING SCHOOL

Written by Canrone Cochin

NDIS DRIVING LESSONS WITH QUALIFIED INSTRUCTORS

We give NDIS driving lessons all week long. Our instructors have attempted NDIS driver preparing to give quality, protected and instructive examples to people with inabilities, for example, Autism, Aspersers, hearing misfortune, fits of anxiety, uneasiness problems and then some. Our educators are patient and loosened up while instructing to assist you with turning into a protected and mindful driver.

COMMON MISTAKES PEOPLE MAKE WITH NDIS DRIVING SCHOOLS

Avoid these common mistakes to get the most out of your driving lessons.


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Learner driver supervisor

Written by Canrone Cochin

You must always drive with a supervisor sitting in the seat next
to you.
Your learner licence can be immediately suspended if you drive
without a supervisor.
Supervisor requirements
Licence
A supervisor must have a full (unrestricted) Australian driver's
licence. This means a driver with a learner, provisional P1 or P2,
or overseas licence must not supervise a learner driver.
See Licence restrictions on page 19.
Both the supervisor and the learner driver can be fined if the
the supervisor does not have a full Australian driver's licence.
Alcohol and drugs
When supervising a learning driver, a supervisor must:
• have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) under 0.05
• not have illegal drugs present in their system or be under
the influence of any drug.
Police can breath-test a supervisor involved in a crash.
If a supervisor is admitted to the hospital after a crash,
medical practitioners can also take blood and urine tests.
See Alcohol limits on page 39.
Police can also test a supervisor who shows signs of being
under the influence of drugs, including prescription drugs.
See Drugs and medicines on page 43.
The same severe penalties for alcohol and drugs that apply
to drivers also apply to supervisors.


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Driving without a licence

Written by Canrone Cochin

You must always carry your licence when driving.
Police can ask to see your licence anytime. If you’re using a digital
driver's licence make sure your phone is charged and the screen is
not cracked.
You can get a fine for driving without your licence with you or
refusing to show it when asked.
Your licence must be:
• current (not expired, suspended or disqualified)
• the correct licence class for the type of vehicle you’re driving
• an NSW licence, unless you’re complying with the current
requirements and conditions for interstate and overseas
driver licences. See Interstate and overseas licences 
Penalties for driving without the correct, current licence include
large fines and prison, and an increase for repeat offences within
5 years.
You must not let anyone without a licence drive your vehicle.


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Medical conditions and disability

Written by Canrone Cochin

When you apply for your driver's licence, you must state whether
you have a medical condition or disability that could affect your
driving. You also need to pass an eyesight test.
Medical conditions
For some medical conditions, such as epilepsy or cardiovascular
conditions, you’ll need regular medical assessments to make sure
you’re fit to drive.
If you develop a medical condition once you’ve got your licence,
you must tell Transport for NSW. This is because driving with a
medical condition can put yourself and other road users at risk.
Failure to follow medical directions can lead to losing your licence.
See Fitness to drive at roads-maritime.transport.nsw.gov.au
People with disability
Disability can have either a minor or serious effect on your
driving ability. If Transport for NSW determines that a disability
has a serious effect, you’ll need to take a test. This is to show
your driving ability and see if you need any aids or vehicle
modifications. You may have conditions placed on your driver's
licence, for example, only driving automatic vehicles.
See Driving with a disability at roads-maritime.transport.nsw.gov.au
As you get older
As you get older, changes to your health may affect your ability to
drive. From the age of 75, you’ll need to pass a medical assessment
and eyesight test every year to keep your driver's licence. From
85, you’ll also need to take a practical driving assessment every 2
years. Alternatively, if you no longer require an unrestricted licence,
you can opt for a modified (ie. local area) licence, without the need
for a practical driving assessment.
See Older drivers at roads-maritime.transport.nsw.gov.au


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Licence restrictions

Written by Canrone Cochin

There are restrictions you must follow when you drive with a:
• Learner licence (Ls)
• Provisional P1 licence (red Ps)
• Provisional P2 licence (green Ps).
These restrictions are in place to help keep you safe as you
develop your driving skills. They also apply when you drive in
another state or territory. If you do not follow these restrictions,
you’ll get a fine. You can also get demerit points or even lose
your licence.
Restriction Applies to
Alcohol limit
Your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) must
be zero.
This means you must not have any alcohol in your
system when you drive.
Maximum speed limit
You can drive to a maximum of 90 km/h.
You must observe all speed limits below 90km/h.
You can drive to a maximum of 100 km/h.
You must observe all speed limits below 100km/h.


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Penalties

Written by Canrone Cochin

Road laws and road rules help keep our roads safe for everyone.
If you break them, you put yourself and other road users at risk.
That’s why penalties apply – to encourage drivers to follow the
rules and keep driving safely.
Penalties range from fines and demerit points to losing your
licence and going to prison. The penalty reflects the safety risk
of the offence. For example, offences that can cause serious
injury or death, such as speeding or drink driving, have more
severe penalties.
Fines
There are fines for every type of driving offence – for example,
parking illegally, speeding, not wearing a seatbelt, driving
a vehicle that’s not registered, or not complying with your
licence restrictions.
You can get a penalty notice on the spot or in the post and you
have to pay a fine. The fine amount depends on the offence. If it’s
a serious offence, you may have to go to court.
See Pay your fine at revenue.nsw.gov.au
Unpaid fines
If you do not pay a fine by the due date, your driver licence can be
suspended and/or your vehicle registration can be cancelled.
If you cannot pay the full amount, you may be able to set up a
payment plan at revenue.nsw.gov.au


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Towing

Written by Canrone Cochin

Be careful when towing a trailer or caravan. You need more
knowledge and skill than for normal driving.
When towing:
• you must not tow more than one trailer at a time
• you must not have any person travelling in a trailer or
caravan you’re towing
• you must secure and cover your load, making sure it does
not overhang.
Learner and provisional P1 drivers have restrictions on what they
can tow. See Licence restrictions on page 19.
You can get a fine and demerit points for towing illegally


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